SIAM.VISA
visa services

THAILAND: BANGKOK
Beautiful Temples in Bangkok

Travel Guides & Information

site design templates
Mobirise

Beautiful Temples in Bangkok

Bangkok is home to over 400 jaw-dropping wats (temples). Some are famous and attract thousands of tourists every day, while others are smaller, less well-known, or simply structures without the colorful decorations that visitors crave. Most Thai temples consist of more than just one building, and many are actually a complex consisting of a main praying hall surrounded by smaller structures – and while the temples make for great photo backgrounds, they also provide a real insight into the history and culture of the nation.

Mobirise

Wat Benchamabophit

Also known as the marble temple because it is built of Italian marble, Wat Benchamabophit used to be a great temple to visit if you wanted smaller crowds around. After being featured as a stop in the Amazing Race 9, however, the temple became more popular, and foreign tourists are now a common sight here. Still quieter than the Grand Palace and other major wats, Benchamabophit is a stunning gold and red temple that definitely deserves a visit.

Built to match the ornate style of King Chulalongkorn's palace nearby, the temple is a stunning combination of high gables, a marble courtyard, and lacquer and gold details on walls and ceilings. Perhaps the most stunning part of the temple, however, is the 52 Buddha images that surround the assembly hall. Rather than being designed especially for the temple, the statues were collected by King Chulalongkorn and presented to the king as a gift. Each statue sits in a different mudra (pose), showcasing different hand and body sacred postures.

Mobirise

Wat Arun

Wat Arun, also known as the "Temple of Dawn," sits on the banks of the Chao Phraya River in Bangkok. Dedicated to the Hindu god Aruna, Wat Arun is a particularly stunning sight in the early morning, as the sunlight reflects on the temple's walls, decorated with Chinese porcelain fashioned into ornate flower petals and glass mosaics in silver and reddish colors.

The temple's 70-meter-tall prang (spire) can be seen from the river, and it's one of Bangkok's most famous landmarks. You can even access Wat Arun from the water by hopping on a water taxi on the other side of the river, where Wat Pho sits.

One of the highlights of visiting this temple is the option to climb the very vertical staircase built on the outdoor wall. If you're not afraid of heights and can manage the narrow steps, you'll be rewarded with beautiful views over the Chao Phraya River and the gabled roof of other temples and structures across the water.

Mobirise

Wat Pho

Wat Pho, also known as the Temple of the Reclining Buddha, is one of the largest temples in Bangkok. The entire temple grounds cover an area of over 80,000 square meters, but only half of it is open to visitors – the other half houses a school and the monk's residential quarters.

Although there are several buildings in the open part of the temple, most visitors come here for the giant reclining Buddha, a 46-meter-long and 15-meter-tall statue covered in gold leaf. While the entire statue is stunning, it's the feet of the Buddha that attract the most attention. Inlaid with mother of pearl and inscribed with auspicious symbols, the feet also display a chakra (energy point) right in the center. Lining up the walls of the hall, visitors will find 108 bronze bowls, where you can drop special coins (brought from the temple) for good health and fortune.

Mobirise

Wat Traimit

Wat Traimit is an elegant, multilevel, white-and-gold temple located at the very beginning of Yaowarat Road, making it a perfect starting point for a Chinatown exploration. The main attraction of Wat Traimit is not only its beautiful architecture but the immense Buddha made of solid gold seated inside – the largest of this kind in the world.

The 5,500-kilogram statue of a seated Buddha made of gold, is valued at over $250 million. The gold statue, which measures three meters in height, dates back to the Sukhothai Dynasty and was probably built around the 13th century.

Mobirise

The Golden Buddha has a similar story to the Emerald Buddha: This 3-metre-high, 5.5-ton solid gold Sukhothai-style Buddha was long hidden under an unimpressive coating of stucco and plaster thought to have been made in the 13th-14th centuries. The gold hidden underneath was only revealed by accident in 1955 when it was dropped whilst moving it, Pieces of the plaster are still kept on display at the temple.

For those interested in the history of the statue, Wat Traimit actually houses a museum with video presentations and photos explaining the background of the Golden Buddha, its time in Ayutthaya, and what happened once the statue was moved.

Mobirise

Wat Suwannaram

Wat Suwannaram started life as a different temple (Wat Thong), then served as an execution ground during the war with Burma and later as a crematorium for members of the royal family. It wasn't until King Rama I ordered its restoration in the 18th century that the temple became the beautiful structure you see today when you visit.

The temple's most striking features are the giant golden Buddha and the red murals that adorn the walls and ceilings – they have been well-preserved and are just as vibrant as they were when painted centuries ago. The grounds of the temple are perfect for a peaceful walk, feeding some fish, and plenty of unique photo opportunities – including the magical tiny library on stilts that sits in the center of a pond.

Mobirise

Wat Suthat Thepwararam

Wat Suthat Thepwararam is an impressive temple in its own right, but it's better known for the giant swing that stands outside. The Sao Ghingcha (unofficially known as the "giant red swing") is 21 meters tall and built entirely of teak wood. The swing has existed in one form or another since 1784, but it had to be reconstructed several times because exposure to the elements deteriorates the wood over the years.

Until 1932, the giant swing was literally a swing – men would ride it by suspending themselves 24 meters up in the air and try to catch a bag of coins with their teeth. That didn't always end up well, and the practice was eventually banned and the swing part removed.

Inside the temple, visitors can see a bronze Buddha statue that comes from the ancient Sukhothai city. The temple's courtyard – even more stunning than the inside of the temple – features 156 Buddha images surrounding the main chapel and lots of hand-carved statues and details embellishing walls and roofs.

Mobirise

Wat Loha Prasat

Bangkok has no lack of majestic temples and each is more elegant and impressive than the next, but Loha Prasat really stands out with its unique architectural identity. Also called the 'Metal Castle', Loha Prasat is located on the ground of Wat Ratchanaddaram and was submitted to UNESCO in 2005 to become a World Heritage site, highlighting the historical importance of the temple. 

Built in 1846 at the request of King Nangklao (Rama III), Loha Prasat Temple in Bangkok is a 36-metre high construction supporting 37 metal spires that represent the 37 virtues toward enlightenment. Inspired by 2 similar temples in India and Sri Lanka, the temple is erected in a very unusual way with multiple concentric square levels built on geometrically aligned pillars. The highest level holds a relic of Buddha. 

Mobirise

Located very near Wat Saket and the Democracy Monument, it's a must-see if you happen to be around Khao San Road. Being located so close to Khaosan and Wat Saket, a visit to Loha Prasat is almost a must if you happen to be visiting this superb area and its Champs Elysées-style avenue.

Don't miss the large white temples of Wat Ratchanaddaram surrounding Loha Prasat itself, as well as the golden seated Buddha and beautiful murals and door carvings. At the back of Loha Prasat, a popular amulet and Buddha statues market is well worth a visit.

A small entrance fee or donation applies for entering this beautiful maze and its spiral staircase.

Mobirise

Wat Prayoon

Located just steps away from the temple of dawn and the Chao Praya River, Wat Prayoon is a small white temple surrounded by gardens, a turtle pond, and a number of beautifully decorated buildings, including a wiharn (chapel) and a bot (ordination hall) covered in colorful mosaics.

The most impressive structure here, however, is the Ayutthaya-style white chedi at the back of the complex. The 80-meter-tall, bell-shaped chedi holds Buddha's relics. When the chedi was restored and repainted a bright white in the mid 2000s, construction workers uncovered a number of amulets and statues from the ground underneath – these have been moved to a small museum within the temple grounds.

Mobirise

Wat Mahathat

Technically outside Bangkok, Wat Mahathat in the ancient town of Ayutthaya makes for a perfect day trip. The old city of Ayutthaya was the official capital of the country until 1767, when the Burmese Army razed and destroyed much of it. Today, over 50 structures remain in the historical park – some more intact than others – but Wat Mahathat is one of the most visited.

The temple occupies a central location in the 290-hectare historical park and it was probably built around the 14th century. While the main prang (tower) collapsed centuries ago, the towers that remain are still impressive. Originally meant to enshrine Buddha's relics, Wat Mahathat was once one of the most important monasteries in Ayutthaya, a place of reverence where important royal ceremonies were held.

Today, the temple attracts visitors because of the famous Buddha's head embedded into a tree trunk and surrounded by roots.

Mobirise

Wat Saket 

Wat Saket also known as the 'Golden Mount' is one of the oldest temples in Bangkok and a sacred pilgrimage site, Wat Saket is also a sight to behold. The temple sits at the top of an 80-meter-tall hill with stunning views over Bangkok Old Town.

The grounds around the temple are decorated with ancient trees, a wall of bells, golden Buddha statues, and a shaded 300-step staircase that encircles the chedi that takes visitors up to the top. Getting to the top does require a climb, but the well-paved path is relatively easy to tackle, especially if you visit early in the day or during mild climate in Bangkok.

Mobirise

The Golden Mount is a sacred pilgrimage site during the week-long worshipping period in November. Following an annual Buddha relic worshipping ceremony, Wat Saket hosts an enormous temple fair during Loy Krathong, usually in November. 

Colourful lanterns and decorative flags, as well as food vendors, fairground games and rides bring Wat Saket to life. Huge crowds pack the temple grounds from early evening to midnight for the entire week. 

Mobirise

During this period, the massive stupa is draped in a bright-red cloth, with a candlelit procession to the top of the Golden Mount marking the start of the week-long festivity.  Colourful lanterns and decorative flags, as well as food vendors, fairground games and rides bring Wat Saket to life. Huge crowds pack the temple grounds from early evening to midnight for the entire week. Plan to go as early as possible to avoid a long queue to the Golden Mount.

Mobirise

Wat Phra Kaew

The Emerald Temple (officially Wat Phra Kaew) is Thailand's most famous and most sacred temple. It's located inside the grounds of the Grand Palace, and it is home to the statue of the Emerald Buddha, considered the protector of Thailand.

Despite its name, the statue isn't made of emerald but of a deep green, single piece of jade stone. It stands 66 centimeters tall, and it's dressed in a special cloak changed personally by the king three times a year, as the seasons change.

The Emerald Buddha sits on a gilded altar, in a wat decorated in shiny green and orange tiles, surrounded by mosaics and marble. It's a stunning room meant to honor the importance of the statue. Outside the entrance to the temple, two giant yakshis (mythical demon giants) guard the temple.

Discover More in Bangkok...

Money Transfers with Wise

Wise formerly Transferwise is the new way to move your money around the world, as easily as possible, for as little as possible. A better, cheaper, fairer system for anyone who lives, travels, or does business across borders.

Click on the banner below to find out more and sign up free for a Wise account today: 

Mobirise
Mobirise

SIAM.VISA
visa services

Get Visa Assistance Here!

Our Immigration consultants and visa specialists have assisted countless amounts of visitors successfully obtain visa approval and renewal without any issues in the application process.

About

Siam.Visa
Visa Services
Siam.Visa
Terms & Conditions
Siam.Visa
Table of Content

Contacts

Visa Services
contact@siam.visa
facebook
siamvisa.facebook.com
Tour Services
contact@siam.visa

Links

Thailand e-visa
https://www.thaievisa.go.th/
Embassies in Bangkok
https://www.embassypages.com
Royal Thai Embassy UK
https://london.thaiembassy.org/